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Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

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The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) is a non-profit organization sponsored by architecture, engineering, planning, development, and construction professionals. Its purpose is to provide best practice information on tall buildings and urban environments as well as facilitating business exchanges amongst the international tall building communities and to make the most recent information available to professionals.

The CTBUH is the arbiter of building heights and determiner of the title of “The World’s Tallest Building.”

The council is currently based at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.

Contents

[edit] History

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat originated as the “Joint Committee on Tall Buildings” in 1969. It was formed by the International Association of Bridge and Structural Engineers and the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Initially, the Joint Committee was located at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

By 1973, emphasis on planning and environmental criteria increased, resulting in a number of other prominent organizations becoming Sponsoring Societies of the Council.

In 1974, the Joint Committee was accepted as a consulting non-governmental organization to the United Nations’ UNESCO, under Category C. By 1979 it was admitted into Category B.

In 1976, the committee changed its name to the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

The CTBUH relocated its headquarters in 2003 to the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago.

[edit] Methods of Measurement

[edit] Height to Architectural Top

Height is measured from sidewalk level of the main entrance to the architectural top of the building, including spires, but not including antennae, signage, or flagpoles. This measurement is the most widely utilized and is used to define the rankings of the 100 Tallest Buildings in the World.[1]

  1. Taipei 101
  2. Petronas Twin Towers
  3. Sears Tower
  4. Jin Mao Tower
  5. Two International Finance Center

[edit] Highest Occupied Floor

Height is measured from sidewalk level of the main entrance to the highest continually occupied floor within the building, not including maintenance areas.[2]

  1. Taipei 101
  2. Sears Tower
  3. Two International Finance Center
  4. Petronas Twin Towers
  5. Empire State Building

[edit] Height to Top of Roof

Height is measured from sidewalk level of the main entrance to the highest point of the building’s main roof level, not including spires or antennas.[3]

  1. Taipei 101
  2. Sears Tower
  3. Two International Finance Center
  4. Empire State Building
  5. Petronas Twin Towers

[edit] Height to Tip

Height is measured from sidewalk level of the main entrance to the highest point of the building, irrespective of material or function of highest element including antennae, flagpoles or signage.[4]

  1. Sears Tower
  2. Taipei 101
  3. John Hancock Center
  4. Petronas Twin Towers
  5. Empire State Building

[edit] References

  1. Criteria for Defining and Measuring Tall Buildings. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, 2008-09-30.
  2. Criteria for Defining and Measuring Tall Buildings. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, 2008-09-30.
  3. Criteria for Defining and Measuring Tall Buildings. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, 2008-09-30.
  4. Criteria for Defining and Measuring Tall Buildings. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, 2008-09-30.

[edit] External Links