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The World

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Projects > Man-made Islands

The World, also known as the Globe Islands, is a man-made archipelago consisting of 300 islands. Located on the coast of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, it cost an estimated $14 billion to construct.

The World was conceived by Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, the ruler of Dubai; it is owned by Nakheel Properties, the company who constructed the islands.

The entire development covers an area of 5.6 miles (9 km) in length and three miles (6 km) in width and is surrounded by an oval breakwater. The islands were constructed out of sand and rock. Once completed, the islands were put up for sale. The cost of an individual island ranges anywhere from $15 million to $50 million.[1]

The project began in 2004 and was completed by March of 2007.

The World development is just one of several major projects to come out of Dubai, including the Palm Islands, the world's largest man-made islands, and the tallest building in the world, the Burj Dubai.

Contents

[edit] Construction History

The project involved constructing an oval-shaped breakwater and a series of 300 islands in the shape of a world map. This involved dredgers to excavate sand from the sea, using loader backhoe attachments to drive the sand into a precise shape of each island in the world.[2] The process of dredging and excavation required a machine that could work well in water and handle materials as fine as sand.

The dredgers removed more than 419 million cubic yards (320 million m3) of sand to build the islands,[3] which range in size from 27,500 to 100,500 square yards (23,000 m² to 84,000 m²). Approximately 164 to 328 feet (50 to 100 m) of water separates each island.

The breakwater was created by dredgers, with grapple attachments that carefully laid each stone in order to produce an oval shape. Thirty-four million tons of rock was used to construct a breakwater 16 miles (27 km) long.

[edit] Completion

Dredgers placed the final rock on the breakwater portion of the project on January 10, 2007. The next phase involved selling the islands for further development and construction. [4]

The islands were completed in March of 2007 and the developments have since been put up for sale. It has been confirmed that the purchase of 14 islands by Investment Dar, including Australia and New Zealand, are being terraformed in preparation to develop a resort named QQYANA.

On March 16, 2007, the Ireland island was purchased by Irish Business Larionovo for the purpose of building 119 units out of imported Irish granite and limestone. [5]

By May 2007, 45 percent of The World had been sold; 20 of those islands were sold within the first four months of 2007.

[edit] Equipment Used

[edit] Refurbishment/Recent Projects/Renovations

The development of each island’s infrastructure is up to the developer to decide.

[edit] Unique Facts

  • The World development can be seen from space.
  • Transportation to the islands is by boat or helicopter only.
  • It has been reported that several celebrities have purchased islands, including Rod Stewart, David Beckham, and Tommy Lee.
  • Richard Branson purchased the Great Britain Island and planted a Union Jack flag on the island to "stake his claim" in 2006. [6]
  • Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie purchased the Ethiopia island in 2007, presumably for their daughter Zahara, who was born in Ethiopia. [7]
  • Sales of individual islands are made by invitation only.
  • Israel, Northern Ireland, and Palestine have not been included on the world archipelago.[8]

[edit] References

  1. The World. Nationmaster. 2008-11-04.
  2. Amazing Architecture of Dubai. Village of Joy. 2008-11-04.
  3. Dubai’s Palm and World Islands. AME Info. 2008-11-04.
  4. News Archives. The World. 2008-11-04.
  5. The World. Nationmaster. 2008-11-04.
  6. The World. Asia Travel Tips. 2008-11-04.
  7. Brangelina Buy Island in Shape of Ethiopia. 9News. 2008-11-04.
  8. Dubais Palm. Howstuffworks.com. 2009-22-04.

[edit] External Sources