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Tree-length Logging

From RitchieWiki

Forestry Processes

Tree-length logging is a mechanized form of logging that involves felling, topping, and delimbing trees at the stump inside the cutblock or, in some circumstances, by the roadside. The felled trees are then transported to the roadside or a landing site and cut-to-length or left tree-length for hauling to a mill.

[edit] Process

Tree-length logging is not practiced as widely across Canada as cut-to-length logging and full-tree logging and in fact experienced a decline between 1980 and 1990.[1] It now accounts for only 15 percent of the total volume harvested in Canada, east of Alberta.[2] As a method, tree-length is applicable for clearcut and shelterwood systems and, to some extent, may also be adapted to thinning operations.

Trees can be felled, topped, and delimbed using chainsaws, feller bunchers, or harvesters. Once felled, the logs are skidded to the roadside or a landing site by a cable or grapple skidder. In some operations, a clam-bunk skidder or crawler tractor may also be used. The logs then either get bucked or slashed, also known as mechanical bucking, into pulpwood or other wood products or hauled as is to a mill for further processing.[3]

One outcome of tree-length logging is the substantial amount of slash produced. Since most of the slash is located inside the cutblock and not at the roadside, it usually gets evenly distributed over the cutblock into small piles.[4] This helps to protect the soil in the cutblock from machine traffic. Sometimes slash can also be chipped with the use of an on-site chipper.

[edit] Equipment Used

[edit] References

  1. Harvesting Practices and Their Implications for Vegetation Management. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Northwest Science and Technology. 2208-11-06.
  2. Harvesting Methods & Systems Defined. Dr.Reino Pulkki, Lakehead University, Faculty of Forestry. 2008-11-06.
  3. Harvesting Practices and Their Implications for Vegetation Management. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Northwest Science and Technology. 2208-11-06.
  4. Harvesting Practices and Their Implications for Vegetation Management. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources Northwest Science and Technology. 2208-11-06.