Equipment Specs
Content
Languages

Xiluodu Hydropower Station

From RitchieWiki

Projects > Dams

The Xiluodu Hydropower Station is a dam and hydroelectric power plant currently being constructed on the Jinsha River in China. Located in the Xiluodu Valley on the border of Yunnan Province’s Yongshin County and Sichuan’s Leibo County. When completed, it will be China’s second largest dam and hydropower station, next to the Three Gorges Dam.[1]

It was designed to provide power generation, control sediment and flooding, and improve navigation downstream. The entire project involves the construction of a dam, power conduit systems and power plants, as well as flood discharge and energy dissipation structures. The estimated cost for the project is US$6.76 billion (50.34 billion yuan).[2] However, the Xiluodu station is expected to bring extra fiscal revenue of US$4.4 million (30 million yuan).[3]

Its superstructure is a double-curvature arch dam with crest elevation of 2,000.8 feet (610 m) and crest length of 2,296 feet (700 m).[4] The maximum height of the dam will be 911.8 feet (278 m). It will consist of seven 41-foot (12.5-m) x 44.28-foot (13.5-m) surface spillways and eight 19.68-foot (6-m) x 21.98-foot (6.7-m) deep outlets arranged on the dam body.[5]

There will be two large underground powerhouses, one on each riverbank. Each powerhouse has nine turbine units with single capacity of 700 megawatts.[6] The total installed capacity will be 12,600 megawatts, with annual power generation of 57.12 terawatt hours.[7] Its power output will be equivalent to that generated by 41 million tons of coal.[8]

The station will require the relocation of more than 7,300 residents. [9]

Contents

[edit] Construction History

The China Three Gorges Project Corp. (CTGPC) decided to build an additional four hydropower stations to work in conjunction with the Three Gorges Dam. The four stations are named Wudongde, Beihetan, Xiangjiaba and Xiluodu respectively. Together, their installed capacity is 38.5 million kilowatts, which is more than double the Three Gorges capacity of 18.2 million kilowatts.[10]

“Officials concede that the construction of four large dams on the Jinsha River, as the upstream Yangtze is called, is likely to be even more challenging than the Three Gorges project because of the area’s geological complexity.”[11]

The hope is that the Xiluodu and Xiangjiaba dams will help to reduce the growing silt buildup problem in the Three Gorges Reservoir.[12] They should also aid in flood control, irrigation, and navigation.[13]

They will be built on the Jinsha River, which is the biggest tributary of the Yangtze River. It is 1,419.8 miles long (2,290 km) extending from Tanggulla Range through Qinghai, Tibet, Yunnan, and Sichuan.[14]

While the Three Gorges Dam provides 28.8 billion cubic yards (22.15 billion m3) of flood-holding capacity, safeguarding the middle and lower sections of the Yangtze, the upper section of the river is still very vulnerable to flood disasters.[15] The current embankments are only capable of withstanding floods that may occur once in five to 20 years, while China requires dykes to contain floods occurring once in 50 to 100 years. [16]

"The Xiluodu project will help improve the flood-control capacity along the whole reach of the 3,600-km long Yangtze River," said Fan Qixiang, vice president of CTGP.[17]

Xiluodu was designed with a reservoir capacity of 16.5 billion cubic yards (12.67 billion m3), of which six billion cubic yards (4.65 billion m3) are for flood control.

Before construction could begin, the whole project was put on hold. In February 2005, China’s State Environmental Protection Administration (SEPA) put a halt on Xiluodu, and a number of other large-scale projects, because contractors had failed to submit environmental assessment reports for approval.

Construction began in December 2005.[18]

Since its hold up with SEPA, the Xiluodu project has claimed to achieve advancements in environmental protection. In April 2007, a deputy director of the Xiluodu project, Peng Jiyin, said soil erosion had declined, improving and protecting the ecological environment of the region.[19] Jiyin said by the end of 2006 they had spent US$85 million on environmental protection (RMB 586 million).[20]

At 9:30am on November 8, 2007, the CTGPC began damming the Jinsha River.[21] By 3:38 pm the next day, they had finished.[22] In just over 30 hours they had dammed the river at a point where it was 154.2 feet (47 m) wide, with water running at a speed of 23 feet (7 m) per second.[23] They were able to accomplish this with the help of five massive control gates: four weighing 1,200 tons and one weighing 1,600 tons.[24] The gates were operated by fixed headstock gears provided by Citic Heavy Machinery. Drive units to power the headstock gears were supplied by Vacon. Each gate required four Vacon NXP drives.[25]

The Xiluodu project is still under construction. The first generating unit is to be installed in June 2012.[26] The entire station is to be fully operational in 2015.[27]

[edit] Controversy

As was the case with the Three Gorges project, the construction of four more hydropower stations along the Yangtze has been met with resistance.

“Building more dams to relieve silt build-ups only transfers the problem upstream,” said Patricia Adams, the executive director of Probe International, a Toronto-based pressure group.[28]

“Some critics have even suggested that the benefits of the Xiluodu and Xiangjiaba projects has been exaggerated in order to provide more work for the engineers, technicians and laborers on the CTGPC payroll as construction at the Three Gorges comes to an end.”[29]

[edit] Equipment Used

[edit] References

  1. China plans four more mega dams to harness the Yangtze. Patagonia Under Siege, December, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  2. China completes river damming for 2nd largest hydropower plant project. China Economic Net, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  3. China plans four more mega dams to harness the Yangtze. Patagonia Under Siege, December, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  4. http://www.icold-cigb.org.cn/news/li080321-14-Xiluodu.pdf
  5. http://www.icold-cigb.org.cn/news/li080321-14-Xiluodu.pdf
  6. http://www.icold-cigb.org.cn/news/li080321-14-Xiluodu.pdf
  7. http://www.icold-cigb.org.cn/news/li080321-14-Xiluodu.pdf
  8. Xiluodu: Jinsha River dammed; 2nd largest hydropower project in China. China Elections & Governance, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  9. China plans four more mega dams to harness the Yangtze. Patagonia Under Siege, December, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  10. Another 'Three Gorges' Project on China's Jinshajiang River. English.People.com, 2008-09-24.
  11. Three Gorges Probe: Xiangjiaba and Xiluodu hydropower projects ready to be launched. Suijiang-Government.com, 2008-09-24.
  12. China to Build New Hydropower Project on Upper Yangtze River. ChinaGate.com.cn, November, 2006. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  13. China to Build New Hydropower Project on Upper Yangtze River. ChinaGate.com.cn, November, 2006. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  14. China to Build New Hydropower Project on Upper Yangtze River. ChinaGate.com.cn, November, 2006. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  15. Xiluodu Hydropower Plant to ease Three Gorges Dam's pressure in flood control. ChinaView.cn, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  16. Xiluodu Hydropower Plant to ease Three Gorges Dam's pressure in flood control. ChinaView.cn, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  17. Xiluodu Hydropower Plant to ease Three Gorges Dam's pressure in flood control. ChinaView.cn, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  18. http://www.icold-cigb.org.cn/zt/learning4/tongzhi-e1.pdf
  19. Xiluodu Hydropower Station Focuses on Sustainability ChinaCSR.com, April, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  20. Xiluodu Hydropower Station Focuses on Sustainability ChinaCSR.com, April, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  21. China completes river damming for 2nd largest hydropower plant project. China Economic Net, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  22. China completes river damming for 2nd largest hydropower plant project. China Economic Net, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  23. China completes river damming for 2nd largest hydropower plant project. China Economic Net, November, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  24. Key stage in construction of Xiluodu hydropower plant, 2008-09-24.
  25. Key stage in construction of Xiluodu hydropower plant, 2008-09-24.
  26. Xiluodu Hydropower Station Focuses on Sustainability ChinaCSR.com, April, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  27. Xiluodu Hydropower Station Focuses on Sustainability ChinaCSR.com, April, 2007. (accessed: 2008-09-24)
  28. Stanway, David. Three Gorges Dam nears completion, critics fear catastrophe. TEW, 2008-09-24.
  29. Stanway, David. Three Gorges Dam nears completion, critics fear catastrophe. TEW, 2008-09-24.